2015 Paris Agreement Ireland

As part of the 2015 Paris Agreement, all UN member countries agreed on the need to keep the average global temperature increase well below 2°C and the need to make efforts to limit global warming to 1.5°C. Countries also agreed that this meant in short that all emissions should be reduced as quickly as possible. Yet Ireland`s emissions are rising. All countries must play their part and Ireland contributes disproportionately to climate change and has the third highest level of emissions per capita in the EU. The Ireland Climate Act 2015 created its own Climate Change Advisory Council. Here is what the Council had to say in a report after the approval of the National Mitigation Plan: „There is an urgent need for additional effective measures to put the economy on the ecologically sustainable path to a low-carbon Ireland by 2050. While the draft national mitigation plan has identified a number of policy options, it is essential to put in place and commit to new policies and measures to reduce emissions at a lower cost. The 2015 Paris Agreement and the commitment to continue efforts to limit temperature increases to 1.5 degrees „were a big step forward in securing the future of our planet,“ the report said. „However, the contributions proposed during the Paris discussions are far from sufficient to keep temperature increases below this threshold. That is why, like all other countries in the world, the European Union must urgently and significantly step up its action, well beyond the objectives agreed at present. We argue that the government`s approval of the National Co-ment Plan in 2017 is contrary to Ireland`s Climate Act 2015, the Constitution and human rights obligations.

We also claim that the plan is well below the measures required by the Paris Agreement on climate change. The agreement was reached due to international unrest and concerns about the future of the planet under the threat of climate change. The precursor to the Paris Agreement, the Kyoto Protocol, was introduced in 1997 and set emissions targets, but did not stop global warming and greenhouse gas emissions continued to rise. . . .